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Annual Meeting Highlights
 DOI: 10.1176/appi.pn.2014.2b3
Show Your Colleagues Your Creative Side
Psychiatric News
Volume 49 Number 4 page 1

Abstract

A poem called “Tomorrow,” a stained glass window called “The Kiss,” and a photo of tango dancers were three of the works of art that earned top prizes at past APA Art Association exhibits.

Abstract Teaser
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This painting won” Best in Show” at the APA Art Association exhibit in 2011. It is titled “Travel Through Humanity: A Moroccan Man” and was painted by Karen Redding.

APA Art Association

Freud had a son, Ernst, who was an architect, and a grandson, Lucian, who was a well-known painter. His great-granddaughter, Jane McAdam Freud, is an acclaimed sculptor working in London. Thus, artistic talent may have coursed through Freud’s blood, even though his main interests were cerebral.

And the same may hold for many psychiatrists: even though their major interests are intellectual, they harbor creative urges that they express via a wide range of media.

Are you one of these psychiatrists? Do you write poetry, paint, take photographs, or engage in some other form of creative activity? If so, you might want to display some of your work at the APA Art Association’s exhibit at this year’s annual meeting.

The work can be in the following categories: black and white or color photography, ceramics, computer art, crafts, fiber, graphics, jewelry, painting (mixed, oil, or water-based), poetry, and sculpture. Artists can submit up to six works.

To exhibit, you must be an APA member, a spouse or partner of an APA member, a member of the Canadian Psychiatric Association, or a full-time staff member of APA.

The APA Art Association, which includes at least 70 members, was founded by a Florida psychiatrist, the late Norman Schulack, M.D., in 1969. “He did gorgeous goldsmith work,” Paul Wick, M.D., president of the association in 2012, told Psychiatric News. The number of people exhibiting each year has been between 15 and 50, Wick reported, with the number of visitors running into the thousands.

Visitors to the exhibit can vote for their favorite work. Some of the winners over the years have been a stained glass window called “The Kiss,” by Gail Barton, M.D.; a poem, “Tomorrow,” by Ferruccio DiCori; a watercolor, “Haunted House,” by Aydogan Ugar, M.D.; a sculpture, “In Perfect Balance,” by T.A. Flanagan, M.D.; and a photo, “The Tango,” by Robert Trivus, M.D.

“The cardinal objective of the show is to get our fellow psychiatrists to discover their talents and express it,” Habib Nathan, M.D., the current president of the APA Art Association and a past APA Art Association exhibit awardee, said. “Furthermore, the feedback that we receive is most rewarding.” ■

To learn more about how to enter artwork in the exhibit, go to www.psych.org, then click on “Annual Meeting,” and then on “Information Guide.” Information about the exhibit is posted on pages 4 and 56. You can also contact Nathan at (210) 836-8575 or nathanhabib@yahoo.com.

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This painting won” Best in Show” at the APA Art Association exhibit in 2011. It is titled “Travel Through Humanity: A Moroccan Man” and was painted by Karen Redding.

APA Art Association

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