0
APA 165th Annual Meeting Course Guide
APA 165th Annual Meeting Course Guide
Psychiatric News
Volume 47 Number 2 page 15-19

There are three easy ways to register for APA’s 2012 annual meeting and courses. The deadline for advance registration is April 6. Annual meeting information can be accessed from APA’s Web site at www.psych.org/annualmeeting.

Register online: Go to the URL above and scroll down to “Registration Now Open.” Save $10 by registering online.

Fax registration form: Fax your completed registration form with credit card information to (703) 907-1097. There is a $10 processing fee for faxed forms.

Mail registration form: Mail your completed registration form and payment (by credit card or check made payable to APA) to American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, P.O. Box 418237, Boston, Mass. 02241-8237. There is a $10 processing fee for mailed forms.

After April 6, you may register online only (on-site fees apply), not by mail or fax. You can also register on site.

Attend a master course at APA’s 2012 annual meeting and receive an accompanying reference as part of your admission! The deadline for advance registration is April 6.

+

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

Director: Arden D. Dingle, M.D. Co-Director: Robert Boland, M.D. Faculty: Richard Balon, M.D., Sandra DeJong, M.D., Natalie Lester, M.D., Avram Mack, M.D., Vishal Madaan, M.D., Anthony Rostain, M.D., Mark Servis, M.D., Marcy Verduin, M.D.

Essential psychiatric and neurology topics will be discussed using multiple-choice questions. Audience members will use an audience-response system to respond before correct answers, full explanations, and references are given. The price includes a copy of a reference book. Convention Center; advance: $345; on site: $375; spaces available: 150

+

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

Director: Glen O. Gabbard, M.D. Faculty: Mantosh Dewan, M.D., Valdesha Ball, M.D., Gabrielle Hobday, M.D., Holly Crisp-Han, M.D.

This course provides an overview of strategies to address common challenges in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Faculty members will review and discuss recent research on the use of transference work in psychotherapy, the formulation of transference interpretations, the challenges in brief dynamic therapy, and racial and ethnic issues in psychotherapy. Vignettes that feature clinical dilemmas for the therapist in dynamic therapy will be included. Convention Center; advance: $345; on site $375; spaces available: 200

+

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

Director: Jesse Wright, M.D., Ph.D. Faculty: Donna Sudak, M.D., Robert Goisman, M.D., Judith Beck, Ph.D.

Clinicians will learn the fundamentals of cognitive-behavior therapy, including the basic cognitive-behavioral model, the collaborative empirical relationship, methods of structuring and educating, techniques for changing dysfunctional automatic thoughts and schemas, behavioral interventions for anxiety and depression, and strategies of improving medication adherence. The price includes a copy of Learning Cognitive-Behavior Therapy: An Illustrated Guide. Convention Center; advance: $345; on site: $375; spaces available: 200

+

MONDAY, MAY 7, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

Director: Alan F. Schatzberg, M.D. Co-Director: Charles Debattista, M.D. Faculty: Ira Glick, M.D., Natalie Rasgon, M.D., Kiki Chang, M.D., Terence Ketter, M.D.

This course, designed for psychiatric clinicians, will focus on the cutting-edge issues every clinician needs to know to ensure quality care. Advances over the last year will be highlighted, with a particular focus on depressive disorder, bipolar disorders, child/adolescent disorders, women’s health disorders and treatment, and schizophrenia. Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $345; on site: $375; spaces available: 300

+

TUESDAY, MAY 8, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

Director: Christopher J. Kratochvil, M.D. Faculty: Karen D. Wagner, M.D., Christopher McDougle, M.D., John T. Walkup, M.D.

This course will provide practical information on the use of psychotropic medications in the treatment of children and adolescents. Topics include an overview and discussion of recent data in pediatric psychopharmacology, with a focus on mood disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Management of adverse effects will be reviewed as well. Convention Center; advance: $345; on site: $375; spaces available: 150

+

+

BRAIN STIMULATION THERAPIES IN PSYCHIATRY

Director: Ziad H. Nahas, M.D. Faculty: Linda Carpenter, M.D., Darin Dougherty, M.D., Husain Mustafa, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) recognize the different brain stimulation modalities like ECT, TMS, VNS, DBS, tDCS, and others; and (2) understand their role in treating neuro-psychiatric conditions. Saturday, May 5, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 75

+

HOW TO DETECT, PREVENT AND TREAT BULLYING-RELATED MORBIDITY ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

Director: Jorge Srabstein, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the nature and ecology of bullying across all social settings and along the lifespan; (2) recognize bullying-related morbidity and mortality risks; (3) provide clinical detection and intervention to reduce bullying-related morbidity; (4) advocate for the implementation of public policy for the prevention of bullying-related morbidity along the lifespan; and (5) contribute to the prevention of bullying-related health and safety risks within a whole community strategy. Saturday, May 5, 8–noon, half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available 100

+

OFFICE-BASED BUPRENORPHINE TREATMENT OF OPIOID-DEPENDENT PATIENTS

Director: Petros Levounis, M.D. Faculty: John Renner, M.D., Andrew Saxon, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify the clinically relevant pharmacological characteristics of buprenorphine; (2) describe the resources needed to set up office-based treatment with buprenorphine for patients with opioid dependence; and (3) list three factors to consider in determining if the patient is an appropriate candidate for office-based treatment with buprenorphine. Saturday, May 5, 8–5; full day, 8 hours; Convention Center; advance: $295; on site: $335; spaces available: 55

+

INTEGRATING BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND PRIMARY CARE: PRACTICAL SKILLS FOR THE CONSULTANT TEAM PSYCHIATRIST

Director: Lori Raney M.D. Co-Director: Jurgen Unutzer, M.D. Faculty: John Kern, M.D., Anna Ratzliff, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe the typical roles for the consulting psychiatrist on an integrated care team and their interactions with the other team members; (2) develop a workflow for the integrated practice that takes into consideration the modality of consultation, methods of communication, and efficiencies; (3) describe the practice environment in which integrated care teams must function and the needs and challenges in providing behavioral health services in primary care; (4) describe the spectrum of integration models in primary care settings and the research base that exists for collaborative care; and (5) identify specific strategies to address comorbid medical illnesses in mental health settings. Saturday, May 5, 9–4, half day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available 50

+

KUNDALINI YOGA MEDITATION FOR ANXIETY DISORDERS INCLUDING OCD, DEPRESSION, ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

Director: David Shannahoff-Khalsa, B.A. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should (1) have skills with specific meditation techniques for treating OCD, anxiety disorders, depression, grief, fear, anger, addictions, PTSD, and ADHD; (2) be familiar with published results showing efficacy for new and treatment-refractory OCD and OC spectrum disorders and comorbid patients; and (3) be familiar with novel yogic concepts and techniques in mind-body medicine now published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Saturday, May 5, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 100

+

NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MASQUERADES: MEDICAL AND NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS THAT PRESENT WITH PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS

Director: Jose R. Maldonado, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) recognize the most common clues of presentation suggesting an “organic cause” for psychiatric symptoms; (2) understand the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical features of the most common endocrine, infectious, and metabolic disorders masquerading as psychiatric illness; (3) understand the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical features of the most common autoimmune and neurological disorders masquerading as psychiatric illness; and (4) understand the neurobiology of delirium and learn about prevention and treatment strategies. Saturday, May 5, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 150

+

BASIC CONCEPTS IN ADMINISTRATIVE PSYCHIATRY I

Director: Barry Herman, M.D. Co-Director: Douglas Brandt, M.D. Faculty: L. Mark Russakoff, M.D., Shivkumar Hatti, M.D., Sy Saeed, M.D., David Nace, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate a working knowledge of basic concepts in theoretical, human resource, fiscal, and information technological aspects of administrative psychiatry; and (2) apply these concepts to psychiatric service systems. Saturday, May 5, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 70

+

MELATONIN AND LIGHT TREATMENT OF SAD, SLEEP, AND OTHER BODY CLOCK DISORDERS

Director: Alfred Lewy, M.D., Ph.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) use the salivary dim light melatonin onset and sleep time to phase type circadian sleep and mood disorders as to whether they are phase advanced or phase delayed; (2) then treat them with appropriately timed bright-light exposure (evening or morning, respectively) and/or low-dose melatonin as well other melatonergic drugs in this newest class of antidepressants; and (3) understand the most recent research findings regarding light treatment. Saturday, May 5, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 75

+

NEUROANATOMY OF EMOTIONS

Director: Ricardo Vela, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe the functional neuroanatomical interrelationships of the hypothalamus, amygdala, septal nuclei, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate gyrus; (2) identify the major limbic fiber pathways, their trajectories, and their specific targets; (3) describe how each limbic structure contributes to the specific expression of emotions and attachment behavior; and (4) discuss neuroanatomical–emotional correlates in autism. Saturday, May 5, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

+

MINDFULNESS: PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR PSYCHIATRY

Director: Susan Abbey, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) define “mindfulness”; (2) describe indications and contraindications for referral to mindfulness-based therapeutic programs (MBTP) e.g., MBSR, MBCT, and MBEAT or use with individuals; (3) list common characteristics of MBTPs; (4) explain how mindfulness approaches may be tailored to meet the needs of patients with specific psychiatric disorders, e.g., psychotic disorders, ADHD; and (5) identify mindfulness practices that may reduce their own professional and personal stress. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 75

+

MENTALIZATION-BASED TREATMENT FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Director: Anthony Bateman, M.R.C. Co-Director: Peter Fonagy, Ph.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate an understanding of the mentalizing problems of borderline personality disorder; (2) recognize mentalizing and nonmentalizing interventions; (3) develop and maintain a mentalizing therapeutic stance; and (4) use some basic mentalizing techniques in his/her everyday clinical work. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 115

+

MOTIVATION AND CHANGE: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING

Director: Petros Levounis, M.D. Co-Director: Bachaar Arnaout, M.D. Faculty: Gary Katzman, M.D., Carla Marienfeld, M.D., Marianne Guschwan, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) discuss the fundamental concepts of motivational interviewing (MI) as a supportive yet directive approach to addiction treatment; (2) use specific MI approaches to help patients move through the stages of change; and (3) apply MI principles to a number of clinical and nonclinical settings from treating patients who participate in 12-step programs to helping change the culture of an organization. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

CLINICIAN’S GUIDE TO ASSESSING AND MANAGING BEHAVIOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA WITH AN EMPHASIS ON THOSE WITH MODERATE TO SEVERE SYMPTOMS

Director: Maureen Nash, M.D. Faculty: Sarah Foidel, OTR/L. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) have a framework for conceptualizing, diagnosing, and treating signifi-cant behavior disturbances in the most common types of dementia with both behavioral and pharmacological interventions; (2) identify and understand cognitive and functional assessments leading to accurate diagnosis of people with dementia; (3) have an understanding of current literature and practical applications of current nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions for people with dementia; (4) understand and differentiate between delirium and behavior disturbance in those with dementia as well as describe appropriate active management of delirium; and (5) define, recognize, and encourage use of appropriate interventions to improve quality of life in people with dementia, especially those with advanced disease. Sunday, May 6, 8– noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

THE DETECTION OF MALINGERED MENTAL ILLNESS

Director: Phillip Resnick, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate skill in detecting deception; (2) detect malingered psychosis; and (3) identify five signs of malingered insanity defenses. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE ASSESSMENT REVEALED: THE DSM-IV-TR OUTLINE FOR CULTURAL FORMULATION DEMONSTRATED WITH VIDEOTAPED CASE VIGNETTES

Director: Russell Lim M.D. Co-Director: Francis Lu, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe interviewing techniques to assess the various aspects of cultural identity after assessing their own and viewing videotaped interviews using the DSM-IV-TR Outline for Cultural Formulation; (2) describe methods to elicit the cultural explanation of the individual illness or explanatory model after viewing a videotaped vignette and a discussion of the different types of explanatory models; (3) describe methods to elicit the stressors and supports of a patient by using a focused developmental and social history; (4) discuss and identify ethnocultural transference and countertransference after discussing a journal article and viewing a videotaped vignette of a patient and therapist experiencing both phenomenon; and (5) describe how to formulate a case and how to negotiate a treatment plan with a patient after watching and discussing a videotaped vignette of an interview and its summarizing statement. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon, half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 50

+

MOOD DISORDERS IN LATER LIFE

Director: James Ellison, M.D., M.P.H. Co-Director: Yusuf Sivrioglu, M.D. Faculty: Donald Davidoff, Ph.D., Brent Forester, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) implement a systematic approach for evaluating patients with late-life mood disorders; (2) guide treatment planning by drawing upon a range of evidence-based somatic and psychotherapeutic approaches; and (3) understand more fully the interrelationships between mood disorders and cerebrovascular disease in older adults. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 50

+

CURRENT PROCEDURAL TERMINOLOGY CODING AND DOCUMENTATION

Director: Ronald Burd, M.D. Faculty: Chester Schmidt, M.D., Ronald Burd, M.D., David Nace, M.D., Jeremy Musher, M.D., Allan Anderson, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the use of psychiatric evaluation codes, therapeutic procedure codes, and evaluation and management codes and (2) document the provision of services denoted by the above sets of codes. Sunday, May 6, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 60

+

TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

Director: Philip Janicak, M.D. Faculty: Stephen Marder, M.D., Philip Janicak, M.D., Rajiv Tandon, M.D., Morris Goldman, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe the psychopathological dimensions and neurobiological underpinnings of schizophrenia; (2) describe the clinically relevant pharmacological aspects of first- and second-generation anti-psychotics; (3) understand their use for acute and chronic schizophrenia; and (4) describe recent approaches to integrating antipsychotics with psychosocial and rehabilitation programs. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 100

+

KUNDALINI YOGA MEDITATION TECHNIQUES FOR SCHIZOPHRENIA, THE PERSONALITY DISORDERS, AND AUTISM

Director: David Shannahoff-Khalsa, B.A. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should (1) have skills with techniques for treating schizophrenia, the 10 APA-defined personality disorders, and autism; (2) be familiar with case histories of schizophrenia, personality disorders, and autism; (3) be familiar with background studies published showing the efficacy of Kundalini yoga meditation for OCD and OC spectrum disorders; and (4) be familiar with novel yogic perspectives for treating personality and autism disorders. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 100

+

BASIC CONCEPTS IN ADMINISTRATIVE PSYCHIATRY II

Director: Douglas Brandt, M.D. Co-Director: Wayne Creelman, M.D. Faculty: Arthur Lazarus, M.D., Jeri Davis, M.B.A., William Reid, M.D., Robert Atkins, M.D., Alan Axelson, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate a working knowledge of basic concepts in psychiatric care management, marketing tools and principles, legal and ethical aspects of administrative practice, and professional and career issues relevant to psychiatric administrators and (2) apply these concepts to psychiatric service systems. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 70

+

ESSENTIALS OF ASSESSING AND TREATING ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER IN ADULTS AND CHILDREN

Director: Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D. Faculty: Anthony Rostain, M.D., Jefferson Prince, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) recognize impairments caused by attention-deficit disorders in adults or children; (2) assess and diagnose adults and/or children for ADHD using appropriate instruments and methods; (3) select and manage appropriate medications for ADHD and comorbid disorders; and (4) design appropriate multimodal treatment programs for adults or children with ADHD. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 50

+

DAVANLOO’S INTENSIVE SHORT-TERM DYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

Director: James Schubmehl, M.D. Co-Director: Alan Beeber, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the forces underlying human psychopathology, including the crucial elements of the healing process; (2) describe the main elements of Davanloo’s technique and apply them in his/her own clinical practices; and (3) know the contraindications for Davanloo’s ISTDP and understand the reason(s) for each. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 85

+

PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: APPLYING PRACTICAL PSYCHODYNAMICS TO IMPROVE PHARMACOLOGIC OUTCOMES WITH TREATMENT-RESISTANT PATIENTS

Director: David Mintz, M.D. Faculty: Barri Belnap, M.D., David Flynn, M.D., Samar Habl, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe the evidence base linking meaning factors and medication response; (2) construct an integrated biopsychosocial treatment frame; (3) recognize common psychodynamics of pharmacologic treatment resistance; (4) use psychodynamic interventions to address psychodynamic sources of resistance to medications; and (5) recognize and contain countertransference contributions to pharmacologic treatment resistance. Sunday, May 6, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 85

+

+

EXPLORING TECHNOLOGIES IN PSYCHIATRY

Director: Robert Kennedy, M.D. Co-Director: John Luo, M.D. Faculty: Carlyle Chan, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the various current technologies and connections that are possible in medicine and psychiatry; (2) review the emerging technologies and how they will impact the practice of medicine in the near future; and (3) recognize the pros and cons of electronic physician-patient communication. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

THE PSYCHIATRIST AS EXPERT WITNESS

Director: Phillip Resnick, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify ways that psychiatrists give more effective expert-witness testimony; (2) recognize and understand the rules of evidence and courtroom privilege; and (3) identify and understand issues of power and control in the witness/cross-examiner relationship. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

ADVANCED ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

Director: Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D. Faculty: Jefferson Prince, M.D., Anthony Rostain, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand emerging new models of ADHD as developmentally impaired executive function of the brain; (2) explain high rates of comorbidity of ADHD with other psychiatric disorders; (3) adequately assess more complicated cases of ADHD; (4) describe how medication treatments should be modified to deal with psychiatric or medical complications; and (5) develop treatment plans to effectively address complicated cases of ADHD across the lifespan. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

ADVANCES IN NEUROPSYCHIATRY: THE NEUROPSYCHIATRY OF EMOTION AND ITS DISORDERS

Director: C. Edward Coffey, M.D. Faculty: Michael Trimble, M.D., Robert G. Robinson, M.D., Matthew Menza, M.D., M. Justin Coffey, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate knowledge of the neurobiology of emotion; (2) demonstrate knowledge of the pathophysiology of mood disorders; and (3) demonstrate knowledge of the management of mood disorders in patients with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s disease. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 125

+

ECT PRACTICE UPDATE FOR THE GENERAL PSYCHIATRIST

Director: Laurie McCormick, M.D. Faculty: Andrew Krystal, M.D., Peter Rosenquist, M.D., Laurie McCormick, M.D., Charles Kellner, M.D., Donald Eknoyan, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) consider the indications and risk factors for ECT and estimate likely outcomes based upon patient characteristics; (2) define the physiologic and neurocognitive effects of ECT as they relate to specific and potentially high-risk patient populations; (3) review the evidence related to ECT stimulus characteristics and summarize the differences between brief and ultra-brief pulse width stimuli; and (4) define strategies for optimizing treatment outcomes during the ECT course and maintaining remission over time. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 50

+

STREET DRUGS AND MENTAL DISORDERS: OVERVIEW AND TREATMENT OF DUAL-DIAGNOSIS PATIENTS

Director: John Tsuang, M.D. Faculty: Reef Karim, M.D., Larissa Mooney, M.D., Timothy W. Fong, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the issues relating to the treatment of dual-diagnosis patients; (2) know popular street drugs and club drugs; (3) discuss the available pharmacological agents for treatment of dual-diagnosis patients; and (4) learn the harm-reduction versus the abstinence model for dual-diagnosis patients. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 85

+

MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING FOR ROUTINE PSYCHIATRIC PRACTICE

Director: Steven Cole, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe three questions and four skills of Brief Action Planning (BAP); (2) explain how BAP aligns with the “Spirit of Motivational Interviewing” (SMI); (3) discuss 13 advanced communication and MI skills for persistent unhealthy behavior; (4) use BAP and 20 skills of Comprehensive Motivational Interventions (CMI) in routine practice; and (5) teach BAP to trainees, team members, or colleagues. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 85

+

DISASTER PSYCHIATRY

Director: Anand Pandya, M.D. Co-Director: Frederick Stoddard, M.D. Faculty: David Benedek, M.D., Kristina Jones, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) adapt the standard psychiatric evaluation to assess common postdisaster problems; (2) describe evidence-based interventions for psychiatric problems after a disaster; (3) describe the psychological impacts of disasters on children and interventions to mitigate this impact; and (4) describe the systems issues that affect postdisaster psychiatric practice. Monday, May 7, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 60

+

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: DIAGNOSTIC CLASSIFICATION, NEUROBIOLOGY, BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS, AND PHARMACOLOGIC MANAGEMENT

Director: Kimberly Stigler, M.D. Co-Director: Alice Mao, M.D. Faculty: Mathew Brams, M.D., Eric Courchesne, Ph.D., James Sutcliffe, Ph.D., Stephanie Hamarman, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand how to more accurately diagnose autism spectrum disorders (ASDs); (2) assist parents with the development of an integrated biopsychosocial treatment plan; (3) discuss emerging research findings on the genetics of autism; (4) review new neurobiological findings in autism; (5) review the psychopharmacology of ASDs; and (6) describe educational and behavioral interventions for ASDs over the lifespan. Monday, May 7, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 115

+

CAN’T WORK OR WON’T WORK? PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITY EVALUATION

Director: Liza Gold, M.D. Faculty: Marilyn Price, M.D., Donna Vander-pool, J.D., William Stejskal, Ph.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) analyze the relationship between psychiatric disorders, impairment, and disability; (2) identify psychiatric and nonpsychiatric factors relevant in disability evaluations; (3) become familiar with a “work capacity” model to develop a disability case formulation and answer most frequently asked questions in a disability evaluation; (4) identify uses of psychological testing in disability evaluations; and (5) understand potential liability associated with performing disability evaluations and develop related risk-management skills. Monday, May 7, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 100

+

TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE: PRINCIPLES AND IMPLEMENTATION

Director: Sylvia Atdjian, M.D. Faculty: Tonier Cain, Lyndra Bills, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) list trauma spectrum disorders; (2) understand the prevalence and impact of trauma on symptom formation and behavioral manifestations in individuals with psychiatric illness; (3) recognize the importance of creating environments that facilitate self-soothing in the healing of trauma survivors; and (4) identify practical strategies to implement trauma-informed care in all settings that treat individuals with mental illness. Monday, May 7, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 65

+

A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO RISK ASSESSMENT

Director: William Campbell, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify risk factors for suicide and violence; (2) formulate risk assessments for suicide and violence; and (3) develop risk-reduction plans for suicide and violence. Monday, May 7, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 65

+

ADULT SEXUAL LOVE AND INFIDELITY

Director: Stephen Levine, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) recognize and articulate the meanings and processes of love; (2) define and use the power of psychological intimacy to promote the lives of couples; (3) recognize the private mental and behavioral experiences with infidelity; and (4) calmly think about extradyadic sex without reflexive moral censure. Monday, May 7, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 125

+

REPETITIVE HEAD INJURY IN SPORTS AND OTHER LIFE ACTIVITIES—A PSYCHIATRIC PERSPECTIVE: WHAT TO KNOW AND HOW TO TREAT

Director: Michele Pato M.D. Faculty: Steven Baron, Ph.D., David A.Baron, M.S.Ed., D.O. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) demonstrate the similarities between single-episode TBI and repetitive TBI/head injury in patients; (2) compare the differences between single-episode TBI and repetitive TBI/head injury in patients; (3) improve diagnosis through the use of neurocognitive and neuroim-aging measures; and (4) apply treatment options for TBI/head injury alone and with comorbid conditions. Monday, May 7, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY

Director: John Markowitz, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand the basic rationale and techniques of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression; (2) understand key research supporting its use; and (3) understand some adaptations of IPT for other diagnoses and formats. Monday, May 7, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 65

+

MANAGEMENT OF PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS IN PREGNANT AND POSTPARTUM WOMEN

Director: Shaila Misri, M.D. Co-Director: Diana Carter, M.D. Faculty: Deirdre Ryan, M.D., Shari Lusskin, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should (1) have an increased awareness about psychiatric disorders that occur in pregnancy and postpartum; (2) have an improved ability to identify psychiatric disorders that occur in pregnancy and postpartum; and (3) have an improved ability to treat psychiatric disorders that occur in pregnancy and postpartum. Monday, May 7, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 150

+

TRANSFERENCE-FOCUSED PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER

Director: Frank Yeomans, M.D. Co-Director: Otto Kernberg M.D. Faculty: John Clarkin, Ph.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand and appreciate the central role of an individual’s internal concept of self and others in personality and in personality disorder; (2) understand the need to appropriately structure therapy with borderline patients to decrease acting out and direct emotions into the treatment; and (3) utilize interpretation to help the patient become aware of and gain mastery of aspects of the self that were previously denied and acted out. Monday, May 7, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 85

+

INTERMEDIATE CPT CODING: EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT (E/M) CODES IN DEPTH

Director: Ronald Burd, M.D. Faculty: Jeremy Musher, M.D., David Nace, M.D., Chester Schmidt, M.D., Allan Anderson, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) determine when it is more appropriate to use an E/M code rather than a code specific to psychiatry; (2) appropriately select E/M codes to accurately reflect the nature of the patient encounter; and (3) appropriately document for E/M coding so that no difficulty will be encountered if an audit is conducted. Monday, May 7, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Philadelphia Marriott Hotel; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available 60

+

+

ADHD IN ADULTS— FROM CLINICAL RESEARCH TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Director: Craig Surman, M.D. Faculty: Paul Hammerness, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify the evidence basis that informs assessment and treatment of ADHD in adulthood; (2) demonstrate efficient methods for assessing ADHD symptoms and impairment; (3) develop a personalized treatment plan for adults with ADHD; (4) optimize pharmacologic management of the condition; and (5) implement cognitive-behavior and other therapies for adults with ADHD. Tuesday, May 8, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR VIOLENCE

Director: Phillip Resnick, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify risk factors for violence; (2) improve interview techniques in the assessment of dangerousness; and (3) classify different types of stalk-ers. Tuesday, May 8, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 65

+

COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS

Director: Jesse Wright, M.D., Ph.D. Faculty: David Kingdon, M.D., Douglas Turkington, M.D., Michael Thase, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) utilize cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) interventions for individuals with severe mental disorders; (2) apply CBT techniques to symptoms of psychosis, bipolar disorder, and severe depression; and (3) address treatment-adherence problems. Tuesday, May 8, 8–noon; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 125

+

EVIDENCE-BASED GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOSOCIAL TREATMENTS FOR ADULT ADHD: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Director: Anthony Rostain, M.D. Faculty: Alexandra Philipsen, M.D., Mary Solanto, Ph.D., Russell Ramsay, Ph.D., Susan Sprich, Ph.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) cite major findings from the published literature on psychosocial interventions for adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); (2) describe similarities and differences among two group interventions (Solanto, et al., 2008, 2010, 2011; Philipsen, et al., 2007, 2010) and two individual-focused interventions (Safren and Sprich, 2005, 2010; Ramsay and Rostain, 2006, 2008), all of which are reasonably effective for treating adults with ADHD; and (3) apply individual and group-treatment approaches to the clinical practice setting. Tuesday, May 8, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available 100

+

STEPPS* TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER (*SYSTEMS TRAINING FOR EMOTIONAL PREDICTABILITY & PROBLEM SOLVING)

Director: Donald W. Black, M.D. Faculty: Nancee Blum, M.S.W. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe BPD as an emotional intensity disorder (EID); (2) define and understand a systems approach to treatment of BPD; (3) provide persons with BPD, care providers, and others in the person’s “system” with a common language; (4) describe a variety of settings in which STEPPS or key elements of STEPPS can be applied; and (5) discuss empirical data supportive of STEPPS. Tuesday, May 8, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 50

+

A PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACH TO TREATMENT-RESISTANT MOOD DISORDERS: BREAKING THROUGH TREATMENT RESISTANCE BY FOCUSING ON COMORBIDITY AND AXIS II

Director: Eric Plakun, M.D. Faculty: Edward Shapiro, M.D., David Mintz, M.D., Donald Rosen, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe the importance of treatment-resistant disorders; (2) understand the basics of psychoanalytic object relations theory, primitive defenses, and how they contribute to treatment resistance; and (3) utilize psychodynamic principles to improve outcomes in work with patients with treatment-refractory mood disorders comorbid with other disorders, including prominent Axis II pathology. Tuesday, May 8, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 65

+

YOGA OF THE EAST AND WEST: EXPERIENTIAL BREATH WORK, MOVEMENT, AND MEDITATION

Director: Patricia Gerbarg, M.D. Co-Director: Richard Brown, M.D. Faculty: Richard Brown, M.D., Patricia Gerbarg, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) understand how heart rate variability, sympathovagal balance, and cardiopulmonary resonance contribute to stress resilience; (2) experience Coherent Breathing for stress reduction and learn how to use it for patients; (3) experience the effects of Qigong movements with breathing on stress and tension; and (4) experience Open Focus meditation for stress reduction, improved attention, and relief of physical and psychological distress. Tuesday, May 8, 9–4; full day, 6 hours; Convention Center; advance: $235; on site: $270; spaces available: 100

+

THE EXPERT WITNESS IN PSYCHIATRIC MALPRACTICE CASES

Director: Phillip Resnick M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) identify practical pitfalls of being an expert witness; (2) write better malpractice opinion reports; and (3) be a more effective expert witness in depositions. Tuesday, May 8, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 100

+

HEALTHY BRAIN AGING: EVIDENCE-BASED METHODS TO PRESERVE AND IMPROVE BRAIN HEALTH

Director: George Grossberg M.D. Faculty: Abhilash Desai, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) describe research clarifying different trajectories of cognitive health in older adults; (2) discuss evidence supporting modifiable factors associated with reduced risk of dementia in older adults; and (3) describe specific lifestyle-modification strategies that promote cognitive health in older adults. Tuesday, May 8, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 65

+

GOOD PSYCHIATRIC MANAGEMENT FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: WHAT EVERY PSYCHIATRIST SHOULD KNOW

Director: John Gunderson, M.D. Faculty: Brian Palmer, M.D., Paul Links, M.D. Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant should be able to (1) provide hope and reassurance when disclosing the borderline diagnosis; (2) appreciate the value of being uncertain, cautious, contained, and “not knowing”; (3) recognize how the borderline patient’s changing phenomenology (e.g., depressed, cutting, dissociated) is reactive to the interpersonal context; and (4) offer medication with less risk of noncompliance or overdosing. Tuesday, May 8, 1–5; half day, 4 hours; Convention Center; advance: $160; on site: $185; spaces available: 65. inline-graphic-1.gif

Interactive Graphics

Video

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).