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Annual Meeting Course Guide
WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2003
Psychiatric News
Volume 38 Number 2 page 26-27

COURSE 82:

PSYCHIATRIC INTERVENTIONS IN DISASTERS: LESSONS FROM EXPERIENCE.

APA Committee on Psychiatric Dimensions of Disaster.Director: Carol S. North, M.D. Faculty: Betty Pfefferbaum, M.D., Phebe M. Tucker, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) identify organizational elements of community response to disasters; (2) assess individuals exposed to disasters and other major traumas; (3) differentiate normal from pathologic responses, directing individuals to appropriate interventions; (4) describe posttraumatic mental health effects on children and adults; and 5) discuss appropriate management strategies for postdisaster PTSD in children and adults. Course Level: This is a basic course. No experience or knowledge is required. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 75. Similar courses on this subject will be offered on Sun., May 18, 1-5 (see Course 28), and Tue., May 20, 8-12 (see Course 60).

COURSE 83:

INSANITY DEFENSE EVALUATIONS.

Director: Phillip J. Resnick, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to systematically evaluate criminal defendants and formulate well-reasoned opinions about criminal responsibility. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 40.

COURSE 84:

PSYCHIATRIC GENOMICS: APPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE.

Director: David A. Mrazek, M.D. Faculty: John L. Black, M.D., Brett A. Koplin, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) review basic medical genomics including the identification of new genes with disease relevance; (2) describe genetic markers such as RFLPs and SNPs; (3) identify new ways of characterization of subcategories of disease; (4) learn potential new ways to diagnose and identify risk factors; (5) learn about improved therapeutic interventions through pharmacogenomics; (6) explain two uses of microarray technology in psychogenomic research; (7) interpret genetic test results and communicate the findings to patients and families; (8) learn how to use publicly available bioinformatics databases to search for information about genetic influences on psychiatric illness; and (9) understand the relevance and utility of genetic testing to optimizing outcomes in clinical psychiatric practice. Course Level: This is a basic course. Participants should have some background in basic biology, but this presentation will be designed to provide participants with basic information during the reviews of molecular genetics. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 100.

COURSE 85:

MEDITATION FOR PSYCHOTHERAPISTS AND THE PARADIGM OF HEALTH.

Director: James T. Sacamano, M.D. Faculty: Ira Rechtshaffer, Ph.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to learn the theory and practice of nonreligious meditations on mindfulness, insight, compassion, and spontaneous presence to gain awareness of psychological well-being and principles of Buddhist psychological theory and intersubjective empathy to augment presence and rekindle joy in the discipline of the therapeutic relationship. Course Level: This is a basic, nonreligious course. No previous meditation required. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 25.

COURSE 86:

A PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACH TO TREATMENT REFRACTORY MOOD DISORDERS.

Director: Eric M. Plakun, M.D. Faculty: David L. Mintz, M.D., Edward R. Shapiro, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to enumerate and utilize psychodynamic principles to improve outcomes in work with patients with treatment-refractory mood disorders comorbid with other disorders, including prominent Axis II pathology. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge required. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 25.

COURSE 87:

BEHAVIORAL NEUROANATOMY: AN INTRODUCTION.

Director: Nashaat M. Boutros, M.D. Faculty: David L. Clark, Ph.D., Edward C. Lauterbach, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of the course, the participant should be able to (1) have an overall understanding of the organization of the human brain and (2) relate anatomical regions to psychological functions. Course Level: This is a basic course. No prior experience or knowledge required. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 25. The same exact course will be offered on Sun., May 18, 8-12. See Course 18.

COURSE 88:

ASSESSING THE RISK OF VIOLENCE IN BOTH FORENSIC AND SEX OFFENDER SETTINGS.

Director: Bradley R. Johnson, M.D. Faculty: Judith V. Becker, Ph.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to summarize what is currently known about the prediction of future violence, especially in forensic and sex offender settings, as well as learn how to administer, or where to obtain, a number of violence and sex offender risk-prediction scales. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 8-12, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 50. A similar course on this topic will be offered on Sun., May 18, 8-12. See Course 15 for details.

COURSE 89:

OFFICE-BASED BUPRENORPHINE TREATMENT FOR OPIOID-DEPENDENT PATIENTS.

American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and APA Council on Addiction Psychiatry.Co-Directors: Eric C. Strain, M.D., Thomas R. Kosten, M.D. Faculty: Herbert D. Kleber, M.D., Laura F. McNicholas, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) identify the clinically relevant pharmacological characteristics of buprenorphine; (2) describe the resources needed to set up office-based treatment with buprenorphine for patients with opioid dependence; and (3) list at least five factors to consider in determining whether the patient is an appropriate candidate for office-based treatment with buprenorphine. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should have basic knowledge of diagnosis and treatment of patients with substance abuse disorders. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 8-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $200, On-Site $260, Spaces Available: 100.

COURSE 90: WITHDRAWN

WORLD RELIGIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE.

Director: Mark D. Kline, M.D. Faculty: Amanda Porterfield, Ph.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) recognize the most important and clinically relevant features of religions widely practiced in the world today, with an emphasis on the presence of world religions in North America. (2) Participants will be able to describe how religious factors influence individuals and communities and affect clinical presentations of medical and psychiatric illness and impact clinical interventions. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Wed., May 21, 9-4, Hilton, Fee: Advance $160, On-Site $185, Spaces Available: 50.

COURSE 91:

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: ADVANCED APPROACHES TO TREATMENT.

Director: William E. Reichman, M.D. Faculty: Peter M. Aupperle, M.D., Constanine G. Lyketsos, M.D., Jacobo E. Mintzer, M.D., David L. Sultzer, M.D., Pierre N. Tariot, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to effectively treat the cognitive, functional, and behavioral features of Alzheimer’s disease using the latest clinical techniques and medications. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should have experience and familiarity with diagnosing and treating the principal dementia syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 9-4, Hilton, Fee: Advance $160, On-Site $185, Spaces Available: 75.

COURSE 92:

BACK TO THE FUTURE: THE EVOLUTIONARY FRAMEWORK FOR PSYCHIATRY.

Director: John R. Evaldson, M.D. Faculty: Mark T. Erickson, M.D., Annette J. Hollander, M.D., David Mullen, M.D., Daniel R. Wilson, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to understand the basics of evolutionary theory and how they apply to core areas of human behavior and psychopathology. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should have knowledge of development and psychopathology typical of a psychiatrist. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 9-4, Hilton, Fee: Advance $160, On-Site $185, Spaces Available: 50.

COURSE 93:

ADVANCED HYPNOSIS: APPLICATIONS IN PSYCHIATRY.

Director: Jose R. Maldonado, M.D. Faculty: David Spiegel, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) assess hypnotizability in the clinical setting; (2) develop psychotherapeutic strategies employing hypnosis; and (3) acquire specific treatment strategies for dealing with anxiety, dissociative,k and somatoforms disorders. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Prior training or experience with hypnosis and a basic knowledge in hypnosis will be presumed. Wed., May 21, 9-4, Hilton, Fee: Advance $160, On-Site $185, Spaces Available: 50. A basic course on this topic will be offered on Tue., May 20, 9-4. See Course 74 for details.

COURSE 94:

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: NEUROPSYCHIATRIC ASSESSMENT.

Director: Robert P. Granacher Jr., M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) perform a competent traumatic brain injury assessment for either clinical or forensic purposes; (2) understand the biomechanics and pathophysiology of brain trauma; (3) understand the various psychiatric and neuropsychiatric syndromes seen following traumatic brain injury; and (4) understand the neurobehavioral outcomes of head trauma and the impact on psychosocial functioning in both adults and children. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 9-4, Hilton, Fee: Advance $160, On-Site $185, Spaces Available: 50. A similar course on this topic will be offered on Mon., May 19, 9-4. See Course 44 for details.

COURSE 95:

MEN SEXUALLY ABUSED AS BOYS: MEANINGS, CONSEQUENCES, AND TREATMENT.

Director: Murray D. Schane, M.D. Faculty: Howard Fradkin, Ph.D., Richard Gartner, Ph.D., William Holmes, M.D., Larry A. Morris, Ph.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) summarize the prevalence and characteristics of male sexual abuse; (2) recognize the typical comorbid symptomatologies; (3) develop appropriately broad treatment plans; and (4) list the most effective psychopharmacological interventions. Course Level: This is a basic course. No prior experience or knowledge is required. Wed., May 21, 1-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 75.

COURSE 96:

THE EVALUATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE MAJOR DEMENTIAS.

Director: Raymond A. Faber, M.D. Faculty: Kevin F. Gray, M.D., Randolph B. Schiffer, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) evaluate all major cognitive and higher cortical functions; (2) utilize any of several cognitive and executive function screening batteries; (3) recognize the most common presentations and course of Alzheimer’s disease and appreciate the behavioral disorders that most frequently complicate Alzheimer’s disease; and (4) differentiate Lewy body dementia, frontotemporal dementias, and vascular dementias from Alzheimer’s disease. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should have experience in treating patients with dementia. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 1-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 100.

COURSE 97:

PSYCHIATRY AND THE INTERNET.

Director: Robert S. Kennedy, M.A. Faculty: Robert C. Hsiung, M.D., Thomas A.M. Kramer, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) recognize the power of the Internet as a resource for the practice of psychiatry; (2) review the technology of the Internet and how it impacts the clinician and educator of today; and (3) discuss current and future applications of the Internet for the practice of medicine and psychiatry. Course Level: This is a basic course. No prior experience or knowledge is required. Wed., May 21, 1-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 25.

COURSE 98:

UPDATE ON SLEEP MEDICINE: ADVANCED TOPICS.

Director: Thomas D. Hurwitz, M.D. Faculty: Max Hirshkowitz, Ph.D., Lois E. Krahn, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of the course, the participant should be able to (1) become familiar with recent information on basic sleep physiology, pharmacological influences on sleep, and clinically relevant topics of parasomnias and narcolepsy and (2) interpret the reports generated by clinical sleep laboratory studies. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should be familiar with basic concepts of sleep architecture and sleep disorders and should have completed the basic course on sleep medicine. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 1-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 50. A basic course on this topic will be offered on Tue., May 20, 1-5. See Course 76 for details.

COURSE 99:

TREATING MEDICAL STUDENTS AND PHYSICIANS.

Co-Directors: Michael F. Myers, M.D., Leah J. Dickstein, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) understand the role of stigma and other obstacles to care when treating medical students and physicians; (2) employ advocacy strategies on behalf of their patients; (3) appreciate the challenges when treating physicians with depression; and (4) identify transference and countertransference dynamics. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should have some experience in treating medical students and physicians. This is a revision of a course given last year. Wed., May 21, 1-5, Hilton, Fee: Advance $100, On-Site $130, Spaces Available: 25.

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