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Annual Meeting Course Guide
SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2004
Psychiatric News
Volume 39 Number 2 page 31-32

COURSE 1:

ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF DRUG-INDUCED MOVEMENT DISORDERS

Director: Herman M. Van Praag, M.D. Faculty: Anton J.M. Loonen, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to judge the adequacy of the instruments used or to be used in clinical trials. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 8-12; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 25.

COURSE 2:

ADD IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Director: Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D. Faculty: Jefferson B. Prince, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) recognize types of child and adolescent attention-deficit disorders (ADDs); (2) assess and diagnose ADDs using updated instruments and methods; (3) select appropriate medications for ADDs with comorbid conditions; and (4) design multimodal treatment programs for ADD children and adolescents. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 8-12; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 75. Similar courses on this topic will be offered on Sun., May 2, 8-12, and Mon., May 3, 8-12. See Courses 14 and 38 for details.

COURSE 3:

Using Neurofeedback In Your Practice: Introduction With Hands-On Experience

Co-Directors: Thomas Brod, M.D., Michael Cohen. Faculty: Laurence Hirshberg, Ph.D., Valdene Brown, Ph.D., Henry Mann, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) understand EEG basics; (2) understand how training the EEG effects brain and mental function; (3) recognize indications for EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback); (4) understand how neurofeedback procedures are performed; and (5) evaluate clinical neurofeedback research. Course Level: This is a basic course. No prior experience or knowledge required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 8-12; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 50.

COURSE 4:

INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY

Director: Scott P. Stuart, M.D. Faculty: Paula Ravits, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) conduct interpersonal psychotherapy treatment (IPT); (2) demonstrate knowledge of the research regarding IPT; and (3) deal effectively with difficult and resistant patients using IPT. Course Level: This is a basic course. Knowledge of individual psychotherapy and familiarity with basic psychotherapeutic principles are required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 9-4; Javits Center; fee: advance $160, on site $185; spaces available: 25.

COURSE 5:

THE BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL FORMULATION: AN APPROACH TO ORAL BOARD PRESENTATIONS

Co-Directors: William H. Campbell, M.D., Robert M. Rohrbaugh, M.D. Faculty: Catherine Chiles, M.D., Paul D. Kirwin, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) systematically organize historical data into meaningful diagnostic categories and (2) develop a comprehensive biopsychosocial formulation suitable for oral board presentations. Course Level: This is an intermediate course for board-eligible psychiatrists. Sat., May 1, 9-4; Javits Center; fee: advance $160, on site $185; spaces available: 50.

COURSE 6:

THE CONCEPTUAL BASIS OF PSYCHIATRY

Co-Directors: S. Nassir Ghaemi, M.D., David H. Brendel, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to understand conceptual and philosophical aspects of psychiatric practice and research. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 9-4; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 25.

COURSE 7:

MANAGEMENT OF PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS IN PREGNANT AND POSTPARTUM MOTHERS: OVERVIEW

Co-Directors: Shaila Misri, M.D., Diana Carter, M.B. Faculty: Maria R. Corral, M.D., Deirdre M. Ryan, M.B. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to increase awareness, identification, and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy and postpartum. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous knowledge required. This is a revision of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 75.

COURSE 8:

BEHAVIORAL NEUROANATOMY: AN INTRODUCTION

Director: Nashaat N. Boutros, M.D. Faculty: David L. Clark, M.D., Edward C. Lauterbach, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) understand the organization of the human brain and (2) relate brain structures to psychological functions. Course Level: This is a basic course. No prior knowledge or experience required. Those with a significant background in neurosciences may find the course too basic. This is a revision of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 25.

COURSE 9:

PSYCHIATRIC GENOMICS: APPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE

Director: David A. Mrazek, M.D. Faculty: John L. Black, M.D., Brett A. Koplin, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) review basic medical genomics including the identification of new genes with disease relevance; (2) describe genetic markers such as RFLPs and SNPs; (3) identify new ways of characterization of subcategories of disease; (4) learn potential new ways to diagnose and identify risk factors; (5) learn about improved therapeutic interventions through pharmacogenomics; (6) explain two uses of microarray technology in psychogenomic research; (7) interpret genetic test results and communicate the findings to patients and families; (8) learn how to use publicly available bioinformatics databases to search for information about genetic influences on psychiatric illness; and (9) understand the relevance and utility of genetic testing to optimize outcomes in clinical psychiatric practice. Course Level: This is a basic course. Participants should have some background in basic biology, but this course is designed to provide participants with basic review of molecular genetics. This is a revision of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 100.

COURSE 10:

COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR SEVERE MENTAL DISORDERS

Director: Jesse H. Wright, M.D. Faculty: Michael E. Thase, M.D., Monica A. Basco, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to (1) utilize cognitive therapy (CT) interventions for severe depression; (2) apply CT techniques to symptoms of severe depression, psychosis, and bipolar disorder; and (3) address treatment adherence problems. Course Level: This is an intermediate course. Participants should be familiar with principles and practices of cognitive-behavior therapy. This is a repeat of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 50. A similar course on this topic will be offered on Sun., May 2, 1-5. See Course 25 for details.

COURSE 11:

ASSESSING THE RISK OF VIOLENCE IN BOTH FORENSIC AND SEX OFFENDER SETTINGS

Director: Bradley R. Johnson, M.D. Faculty: Judith V. Becker, Ph.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this course, the participant should be able to summarize what is currently known about the prediction of future violence, especially in forensic and sex offender settings, as well as learn how to administer, or where to obtain, a number of violence— and sexual offender—risk prediction scales. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This is a revision of a course given last year. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 50.

COURSE 12:

SYSTEMIC THERAPIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDERS

Director: Peter Steinglass, M.D. Faculty: Marc Galanter, M.D. Educational Objective: At the conclusion on this course, the participant will have been introduced to two of the most thoroughly developed and researched systemic therapies for alcohol and drug disorders: (1) the family systems treatment model developed by Steinglass and colleagues, a model that focuses on how family reorganization around alcohol and/or drug use alters family behavior and why working with the whole family is critical during the assessment and detoxification phases of treatment; and (2) the network therapy model developed by Galanter, a model that uses constructs such as social support, social networks, and stressful life events to improve treatment adherence during the rehabilitation/recovery phases of treatment. Course Level: This is a basic course. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Sat., May 1, 1-5; Javits Center; fee: advance $100, on site $130; spaces available: 50.

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