0
Annual Meeting
No Matter Your Passion, There's a Session to Pique It
Psychiatric News
Volume 44 Number 6 page 24-30

APA members the world over will gather May 16 to 21 for the annual meeting in San Francisco, the City by the Bay known for its Mediterranean-like temperatures, ubiquity in song, and multicultural offerings.

Exactly what is so attractive about San Francisco that it draws tens of thousands of tourists each year and is one of the country's most popular convention sites?

"What's not to like about San Francisco?" asked Josepha Cheong, M.D., of Gainesville, Fla., chair of APA's Scientific Program Committee for the annual meeting and a former resident of San Francisco for 20 years. FIG1

Anchor for JumpAnchor for Jump

Thinking about attending APA's May 16-21 annual meeting in San Francisco? As returning members already know (and newcomers will soon discover), the things to do and places to go are as captivating as the" City by the Bay's" skyline. 

Credit: SFCVB photo by Phil Coblentz

Among the city's many plusses, Cheong noted, are "the weather, the great vistas, the history, the shopping, the vibrant arts and performance culture, and all of the different walking neighborhoods and parks."

Indeed, there are Golden Gate Park, Union Square, Nob Hill, Telegraph Hill, Russian Hill, Castro District, Haight-Ashbury, Chinatown, the Italian enclave of North Beach, Fisherman's Wharf, and Pier 39, to name a few.

"Best of all [is] the variety of restaurants and culinary options," said Cheong.

Yes, the city will offer exciting attractions, but the real star of the show is APA's scientific program.

The theme of this year's meeting is "Shaping Our Future: Science and Service." It was chosen by APA President Nada Stotland, M.D., M.P.H., who has dedicated her professional life to applying the scientific principles of psychiatry in service to individuals, communities, and the public's health overall.

In keeping with this theme, both science and service will be reflected throughout the meeting's six days through interactive forums, lectures, courses, workshops, and symposia. Most are focused on the latest basic and applied research in psychiatry, while others explore topics that relate to the practice of psychiatry such as practice-management issues, health care economics, health information technology, psychiatry and the law, industry relationships, and ethics.

A featured attraction that's new to the meeting is the "Clinical Knowledge and Skills Series." It consists of three daylong courses chaired by master educators; the topics are cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and neuropsychiatry (Psychiatric News, February 20).

Meanwhile, psychiatrists preparing to take Part 1 of the ABPN board certification exam might be interested in registering for the May 16 ABPN board review course. That includes PGY-4 residents, who for the first time this year can sit for the test before their training has been completed. James Bourgeois, M.D., co-editor of the APPI Board Prep and Review Guide for Psychiatry, will lead the course. This course will be held Saturday, May 16, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; course registration is required.

Check out the lecture by Dean Ornish, M.D., best-selling author of Eat More, Weigh Less, and other books, and founder and president of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, Calif. Ornish, a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, will explore the impact of depression on cardiac health and vice versa.

The same day, past APA President Carolyn Robinowitz, M.D., will chair a symposium on depression and heart disease titled "Matters of the Heart."

Meanwhile, San Francisco—or at least two aspects of it—will be the topics of two of the seven Presidential Symposia. Addictions specialists Mark Gold, M.D., and David Smith, M.D., will present "Grand-kids of the 1967 Flower Children: Lessons From Haight-Ashbury." Mel Blaustein, M.D., will lead the session "Suicide and the Golden Gate Bridge."

Blaustein also will introduce the showing of the documentary film" The Bridge." Eric Steel, the film's director, relates the stories of six individuals who during one recent year made use of the bridge to end their lives.

"The public is ambivalent about suicide, but suicide is very impulsive, and because it's impulsive, it's preventable and treatable," Steel said in a San Francisco Chronicle article that ran shortly before the film's April 30, 2006, West Coast premiere.

Here are other meeting highlights:

Anchor for JumpAnchor for Jump

Thinking about attending APA's May 16-21 annual meeting in San Francisco? As returning members already know (and newcomers will soon discover), the things to do and places to go are as captivating as the" City by the Bay's" skyline. 

Credit: SFCVB photo by Phil Coblentz

Interactive Graphics

Video

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Related Articles
Articles